~ National Chocolate Cake Day ~

Chocolate Cake

Image from Foodimentary.com

So, it’s January 27th, which makes today National Chocolate Cake Day.

I’m not as excited about this today as I was last year.

My mister wasn’t a renal patient last year, and chocolate was not off-limits to him.

But today…today is a different story. I’d thought about making a chocolate cake but ruled that out. No matter what his diet limitations are, if I make a chocolate cake, he’s going to eat it.

I then considered going out to lunch and ordering chocolate cake for dessert.

No. If I order it, he will eat it.

My last option is the best. Meet my sisters for lunch and leave him at home! HA!

I realize it sounds cruel, but being the good wife I am, I’m only thinking of his health. And, I get to have my cake and eat it, too! (What does that mean anyway? Why would I have cake if I didn’t plan on eating it???)

I’m actually not a big fan of cake. I am, however, a big fan of chocolate, and in the true spirit of the occasion, I will celebrate!

Like so many of the ‘National’ holidays, an origin for National Chocolate Cake Day could not be found. I don’t think anyone will mind, though – unless they’re allergic to chocolate!

Slice of Chocolate Cake

Image from Google

Did you know that…

A popular Philadelphia cookbook author, Eliza Leslie, published the earliest chocolate cake recipe in 1847 in The Lady’s Receipt Book.

The first French word for chocolate mousse translates in English “chocolate mayonnaise”

The “blood” that you see in the infamous “shower scene” in  Psycho is actually chocolate syrup.

In America, chocolate was consumed primarily as a beverage until the 1830s or 40s.

The history of chocolate cake goes back to 1764 when Dr. James Baker discovered how to make chocolate by grinding cocoa beans between two massive circular millstones.

The first boxed cake mix was created by a company called O. Duff and Sons in the late 1920s.

Betty Crocker released their first dry cake mixes in 1947.

A process for making silkier and smoother chocolate called conching was developed in 1879 by Swiss Rodolphe and made it easier to bake with chocolate as it amalgamates smoothly and completely with cake batters.

In the U.S.A, “chocolate decadence” cakes were popular in the 1980s; in the 1990s, single-serving molten chocolate cakes with liquid chocolate centers and infused chocolates with exotic flavors such as tea, curry, red pepper, passion fruit, and champagne were popular.

 

Chocolate Bear

Image from Google

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13 thoughts on “~ National Chocolate Cake Day ~

  1. I would put a scoop of chocolate ice cream on top and then drown the whole thing in hot fudge sauce. But only if they have dark chocolate. Then it’s good for you…

  2. wow what an interesting article 🙂 I am a sucker for chocolate, if its in the house I eat it. So i try to not have in the house. On Thursday I made some Paleo chocolate fat bombs. Just coconut oil melted, raw cacao, and a small drop of pure maple syrup. Put it into moulds then into the freezer. I had a bit of one on Thursday and ate the rest of it yesterday, which was Chocolate Day.

      • I make bliss balls with it too. it helps me get my chocolate on with not overdoing it. Its so rich. I love going out for a cuppa and trying one of the chocolate cakes in the display case. With cream and ice cream. I figure if your going to do it …do it well lol

  3. I LOVE THIS!!! I’m obsessed with chocolate cake, and am actually getting ready to do a cleanse and a new workout routine, so this totally gives me an excuse to splurge before hand!!! so thank for that lol 🙂

  4. I myself a big fan chocolate too. loved your tale. And sure ill never miss a chance of taking chocolate even if it comes to being cruel at times. Ha.:-) chocolate is our rights.

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