Interview with Sarina Chandler from the upcoming “Family Matters (In the Best Interest of the Child, Book 2)”

Coming Soon! 😉

Felicia Denise, Author


Good day, WordPress bloggers and authors! Today we welcome a very special guest to the blog—Sarina Chandler, from the upcoming Family Matters (In the Best Interest of the Child, Book 2). Sarina is the mother of Books 1 & 2 protagonist, Olivia Chandler.

SC: Excuse me?

FD: Yes, Mrs. Chandler?

SC: Well… technically, I was in book 1, too.

FD: Yes, ma’am you were. But only in a flashback or two, and you weren’t… um, yourself. I thought it best to not approach the subject.

SC: Oh, please! Now you sound like my daughter, not approaching the subject! I was crazy as a loon, out of my mind, off my rocker! It’s not as if I planned it or wanted to be committed to an institution and leave my daughter.

FD: Of course not, ma’am. I’m sorry.

SC: Please call me Sarina… and I’m the one who should be…

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“Tune Up: The Secrets of Mylin – Book I” by Joe Klingler


Tune Up cover

“Tune Up: The Secrets of Mylin – Book I

Genre: Police Procedural/Thriller/Suspense

Release Date: May 1, 2017

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On their second case, Qigiq and Kandy are loaned to the Traffic Division to investigate an early morning accident. Hit and run. By a motorcycle. The victim is an elderly Asian woman. A young witness in a nearby dry cleaner and a truck driver suggest all “accidents” aren’t created equal. Then the Captain drops a new assignment on their desk: an affluent Bay Area lawyer is missing. The man’s wife stomps into their office screaming about a contract she found hidden in the backups of their home computer. A contract with a seven-figure payout, and an incriminating Exhibit A.

Following the trail of both the motorcycle rider and the lawyer with Kandy complaining, “We’re homicide detectives, there should be a body,” leads to a vintage motorcycle club called the Ton Up where lips are sealed, a yacht harbor on the coast where riddles run deep, and a midnight roadside confrontation that ends with a splash. As the trails twist they soon find that these people and places have one thing in common:

A violist named Mylin. Who plays in an all-female orchestra called The Girls of the Orient. And, unbeknownst to her, is the subject of a fine-art photographer’s latest collection.

From San Francisco to Mexico, the treacherous cliffs of the Pacific coast to the desolation of Nevada’s high desert, Tune Up moves like Kandy’s turbocharged Mini through a foggy landscape of false identities, fake romance, and frenzied chases, as Qigiq realizes one picture really can reveal more than 1,000 words.

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JOE KLINGLER is the author of the award-winning suspense novels: RATS, Mash Up, Missing Mona, and his latest thriller, Tune Up. He is a computer scientist, musician, and entrepreneur passionate about writing action-packed novels centered on real-world issues. Tune Up, the second Qigiq and Dreeson thriller, is the first in the Secrets of Mylin series. Joe spends time in California and his native Ohio rides a BMW R1200GS adventure motorcycle and has his eye on a Yamaha XSR900. Find out more about Joe Klingler and his mystery and thriller novels at his official website: JoeKlingler.com.

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5 Great Creative Writing Tips (Which I Never Follow)

Absolutely love – and AGREE with – everything in this post! Enjoy! 😉

A Writer's Path

by Daniella Levy

I am very much a self-taught writer. I had to be; my formal English language education more or less ended in fourth grade when I immigrated to Israel. I learned mostly from reading, writing, and getting feedback from my friends. The only writing book I read during my adolescence was Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.

In recent years, however, I decided to see what I could learn from outside resources. So I took a few online creative writing classes through FutureLearn and Coursera, and read Anne Lammott’s Bird by Bird and Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way. I started reading essays passed around on social media about writing, and watched TED talks about writing and creativity, etc. etc. etc.

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Hooking the Reader with a Killer Opening to Your Book

A Writer's Path

by Helena Fairfax

This is another topic that has made me take a good look at my own writing. My first thought is that it’s vital to have an opening that hooks the reader. Some people say a killer opening is even more important now, since online stores like Amazon have a facility to “Look inside” the book, or to download the first few pages as a sample.

They say readers have too much choice and a short attention span, and we have to be hooked immediately or you lose us. But I think back to the days when there was no Amazon and I could only obtain books from bookshops or libraries. I used to do exactly the same thing before choosing a book – check out the blurb, and then have a read of the opening to see if it grabbed me. If I wasn’t hooked, I put the book back.

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National Ice Cream Day


Today is another of my favorite days – National Ice Cream Day! Today I can celebrate with wild abandon and no guilt—not that I ever feel guilty when eating ice cream, but today I can say, “Hey! I’m celebrating here!” That will calm the masses for all of ten seconds after which, they’ll expect me to share! Aw, man!

Enjoy your favorite ice cream today – no excuses! With dairy free, gluten free, sugar-free, and dye free ice creams available, no one need miss out. Of course, I prefer my ice cream homemade… and pistachio, but offer me store-bought any flavor and see if I turn it down! (Which will only happen if pumpkin or marshmallow are involved! Ew!)

What’s your favorite ice cream flavor?


bowl of ice cream


National Ice Cream Day is observed each year on the 3rd Sunday in July and is a part of National Ice Cream Month.  This day is a fun celebration enjoyed with a bowl, cup or cone filled with your favorite flavor of ice cream.

Thousands of years ago, people in the Persian Empire would put snow in a bowl, pour grape-juice concentrate over it and eat it as a treat.  They did this when the weather was hot and used the snow saved in the cool-keeping underground chambers known as “yakhchal”, or taken from the snowfall that remained at the top of mountains by the summer capital.

It is believed that ice cream was first introduced into the United States by Quaker colonists who brought their ice cream recipes with them.  Their ice cream was sold at shops in New York and other cities during the colonial era.

  • Ben Franklin, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson enjoyed ice cream.
  • 1813 -First Lady Dolley Madison served ice cream at the Inaugural Ball.
  • 1832 – African American confectioner, Augustus Jackson, created multiple ice cream recipes as well as a superior technique to manufacture ice cream.
  • 1843 – Philadelphian, Nancy Johnson, received the first U.S. patent for a small-scale hand-cranked ice cream freezer.
  • 1920 – Harry Burt puts the first ice cream trucks on the streets.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Enjoy National Ice Cream Day by sharing some with your family and friends! Post on social media using #NationalIceCreamDay.

HISTORY

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed July as National Ice Cream Month and established National Ice Cream Day as the third Sunday in the month of July.


ice cream cones

Ice Cream Trivia

The average American eats 26 liters (45.8 pints) of ice-cream a year.

Worldwide, around 15 billion liters (3.3 billion gallons) of ice-cream are consumed every year, enough to fill 5,000 Olympic swimming pools.

According to Nasa, ice-cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

Hawaii and Wisconsin are the only US states with laws governing ice-cream container size.

The last thing Elvis Presley ate was four scoops of ice-cream and six chocolate chip cookies.

Marco Polo brought back from China descriptions of a sherbet dessert.

The cone didn’t appear until 1904 when a Syrian waffle maker at the St. Louis World’s Fair began rolling his pastries into horns to help an ice cream vendor who had run out of dishes.

The idea of the ice cream cone had been patented a year earlier, in 1903, by an Italian in New York City, but the fair popularized it.

Farmers in Vermont used to feed leftovers provided by Ben and Jerry’s to their hogs. The hogs didn’t seem to care for Mint Oreo Cookie.

Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was part of the team that first invented the method of making soft serve ice cream.

 

Compiled from NationalDayCalendar, Useless Daily, and Google.

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10 Tips for Living with Fibromyalgia or Another Life Changing Illness

Good tips!

Watching the Daisies

http-www-pixteller-com-pdata-t-l-416066

In 2010, I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, a chronic condition that affects millions of people around the globe. The majority of them are women. As yet, there is no cure.

I had enjoyed a successful career as a natural medicines therapist and teacher, but fibromyalgia forced me to stop working for 2 years, reassess my life and embrace a new normal. I eventually left my old career behind, and retrained in organic horticulture, teaching part time in schools until recently.

My illness taught me so much, and I will share some of my most important insights. Here are a few suggestions for living with fibromyalgia or another life changing illness.

Reassessing My Values

Illness forced me to reassess my values. Health is now my number one priority, before career, relationships, finances and all else.

I’ve developed a habit of asking myself ” Will this be beneficial to my health and…

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