What to Do After the First Draft

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by Katie McCoach

Your fingers hurt. Your eyes burn. You haven’t had anything to drink except coffee for the past few days, weeks, year. You are pretty sure you haven’t slept a full night without dreaming about characters and plot lines.

You are certain you will never type again. Because you finally finished writing the first draft of your novel. Phew!

No matter how many times an author finishes the first draft of a novel, they know this is only the beginning of the writing process. So what do you even do after you write that first draft? What comes next? Where do you even begin the process of revising, rewriting, sharing, and more?

via What to Do After the First Draft

Subtext #amwriting

Writers, you’ll definitely want to check out this post AND save the link! 😉

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

A good story is far more than a recounting of he said, and she said. It’s more than the action and events that form the arc of the story. A good story is all that, but without good subtext, the story never achieves its true potential.

Within our characters, underneath their dialogue, lurks conflict, anger, rivalry, desire, or pride. Joy, pleasure, fear–as the author, we know those emotions are there, but conveying them without beating the reader over the head is where artistry comes into play. The subtext is the hidden story, the hints and allegations; the secret reasoning. It is the content that supports the dialogue and gives private purpose to the personal events.

These are implicit ideas and emotions. These thoughts and feelings may or may not be verbalized, as subtext is most often shown as the unspoken thoughts and motives of characters — what they really…

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Backstory: The Most Important Sub-Plot You’ll Never Write

Good tips here! Check out Matt Frick’s post on backstory… and his back! 😀 😀

A Writer's Path

by Matt Frick

I suffer from one of the more visible ailments of the Florida tourist. While this particular malady can afflict anyone, regardless of age, race, or sex, a recent non-scientific study at [insert name of beach here] determined those most susceptible were white males over the age of 40.

While I am a match for three of the four descriptors of this largest group, I am no longer a tourist, having established Florida residency over a year ago.

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How It All Began

A good PI story? I’m in! 😉👍

Phyllis Entis

Today’s release of the new cover for The Green Pearl Caper represents a milestone in the coming-of-age of the Damien Dickens Mysteries series.

First published in the spring of 2015, The Green Pearl Caper has garnered numerous 4-star and 5-star reviews on Amazon, goodreads and other book retailer sites, and earned Library Journal’s SELF-e Selection award.

I have been asked, from time to time, how Damien Dickens and his world came into being.

I could say that he was the result of long, careful planning, but that would be a lie.

I could say that the entire plot came to me in a dream, but that, too, would be a lie.

In fact, the genesis of The Green Pearl Caper and the entire Damien Dickens series took place during a drop-in writing workshop in La Jolla, California.

The premise of the hour-long workshop, Pen to Paper, was simple. The moderator…

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Neil Gaiman’s 5 Must-see Tips on Perfecting Your Writing


Neil Gaiman

There are many celebrated writers in this world, but few ever reach the rockstar-level status of dark fantasy author Neil Gaiman.

Fans stand in line for hours at his book signings, only to faint when they finally meet him (or ask him to sign their body so they can get his signature tattooed).

His beloved novels and comics—Coraline, Stardust, American Gods, Good Omens, and The Sandman (to name a few)—have gained cult followings and been adapted for the big screen and television.

His 2012 “Make Good Art” commencement address inspired all of us to break the rules and make mistakes, making it clear that after decades of aspiring writers asking him for advice, Gaiman has a quite a bit of inspiration and wisdom to share.

So whether you’re hunting for magic or just practical tips, we’ve gathered together some of Gaiman’s best advice on writing. Enjoy!

Neil Gaiman’s 5 Must-see Tips on Perfecting Your Writing by Joanna Cutrara

 

Image from The Nerdist

August/September 2017 Writing Contests

Rachel Poli

Writing contests for August and September 2017AUGUST 2017

Genre: Flash Fiction/Non-Fiction/Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Blue Earth Review
Deadline: August 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $5
Prize: $500

Genre: Non-fiction
Theme: Miracles and More
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: August 31, 2017
Entry Fee: N/A
Prize: $200

Genre: Non-Fiction
Theme: Stories of Redemption
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: August 31, 2017
Entry Fee: N/A
Prize: $200

Genre: Fiction
Theme: Very Short (flash)
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: August 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $16
Prize: First – $2,000

Genre: Fiction
Theme: N/A
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: August 31, 2017
Entry Fee:$21
Prize: First – $3,000

September 2017

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: My Crazy Family
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: September 5, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, or Poetry
Theme: None
Website: Still: The Journal
Deadline: September 9, 2017
Entry Fee: $12
Prize: First – $200

Genre: Essay
Theme: None
Website:

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