Posts Tagged Writing Tips

Scrivener: 10 pros and cons of everyone’s favorite writing software

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If you’re a writer and haven’t heard of Scrivener, you’ve most likely been living under a rock. Don’t worry, I was once the same. But the more involved I became in the community, the rumblings got louder and the arguments became more insistent.

Why aren’t you using Scrivener to write your novels?! It’s the best thing EVER.

I can’t tell you how many times I heard it.

First let me explain the gist.

via Scrivener: 10 pros and cons of everyone’s favorite writing software

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On Writing Multiple POVs

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by Lizard is Writing

 

Anonymous asked: “Hi Lizard! I have an idea for a writing piece I want to do. I have characters, a majority of the plot, and a brief outline of the ending. The only thing is, I don’t know how to begin in a way that isn’t overwhelming to the reader. I have a bunch of different characters who all need to be in the same place at the same time. I don’t know how to write in multiple perspectives in a way that doesn’t drag on or go too quickly. Any advice?”

via On Writing Multiple POVs

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What Good Music Can Teach Us About Writing

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by Andrea Lundgren

 

I was thinking about this the other day while on hold. I was waiting for a break in the music that signaled that someone was going to rescue me from the unending monotony, so when the music would change from stringed instruments music to a pause, I’d get excited…only to have the music start another movement.

And it got me thinking about plotting. I realized there are three things we can learn from good music (and from bad music, in a let’s-avoid-doing-what-they-did sort of way).

via What Good Music Can Teach Us About Writing

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The Two Pillars of Novel Structure

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by Michael Mohr

 

I want to talk briefly about novel structure because, as a novel editor, I see all kinds of basic issues from the majority of the aspiring writer-clients I work with. There is a wealth of info out there on the web but I wanted to give you a little taste of what makes a solid novel. Because, especially if you write commercial fiction and hope to land an agent and get published, novel structure is incredibly important to pay attention to.

via The Two Pillars of Novel Structure

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Discover Your Story Plotting Style

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by Ryan Lanz

Has anyone ever told you that you have an architect or gardener style of plotting?

There are all sorts of names for styles of plotting. Another set is pantser/plotter, although those terms never seemed to feel right for me. Both styles have various pros and cons, neither being right or wrong. Each method also has certain strengths and weaknesses, which we’ll go over later in this post.

So which are you? Let’s dive in.

via Discover Your Story Plotting Style

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The 3 Steps to Writing Humor: Channeling Erma

Very helpful! 💯

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by Diane Laney Fitzpatrick

 

We writers all have our heroes. Depending on your genre, personal taste, and even reading experiences that go back as far as grade school, your writing hero might be Edgar Allen Poe or Tolkien, Hemingway or Jane Austen, Mark Twain or James Patterson.

But ask a humor writer to list his role models and you’ll almost certainly find Erma Bombeck.

More than twenty years after her death, Bombeck’s relatable, self-deprecating stories still have the uncanny ability to leave readers laughing out loud, not so much at her, but at themselves. You don’t have to be a mother to laugh at Erma’s take on parenting. (“Once they put a hamster on my chest and when I bolted upright they asked, ‘Do you have any alcohol for the chemistry set?’”)

via The 3 Steps to Writing Humor: Channeling Erma

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Creating Tension in Fiction and Memoir

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by Michael Mohr

One of the toughest things to do in fiction or creative nonfiction writing, in my professional opinion, is to create strong, believable tension. Without tension—between the protagonist and a villain, the protagonist and him/herself, the protagonist and the environment, etc—you really don’t have much of a story. And it’s unlikely readers will want to follow you far through the jungle of your narrative.

Tension seems to be lumped in usually with plot. I agree that plot and tension often go hand in hand, but I also think that stories which essentially lack, for the most part, any real sense of “A-plus-B-equals-C” type of standard plot (meaning one thing happens which forces another to happen, etc, a sort of “causes and conditions” situation) can still grab readers’ interest and hold our attention for 250, 300 pages…as long as you’ve got real, authentic tension.

 

via Creating Tension in Fiction and Memoir

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