Discover Your Story Plotting Style

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by Ryan Lanz

Has anyone ever told you that you have an architect or gardener style of plotting?

There are all sorts of names for styles of plotting. Another set is pantser/plotter, although those terms never seemed to feel right for me. Both styles have various pros and cons, neither being right or wrong. Each method also has certain strengths and weaknesses, which we’ll go over later in this post.

So which are you? Let’s dive in.

via Discover Your Story Plotting Style

The 3 Steps to Writing Humor: Channeling Erma

Very helpful! 💯

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by Diane Laney Fitzpatrick

 

We writers all have our heroes. Depending on your genre, personal taste, and even reading experiences that go back as far as grade school, your writing hero might be Edgar Allen Poe or Tolkien, Hemingway or Jane Austen, Mark Twain or James Patterson.

But ask a humor writer to list his role models and you’ll almost certainly find Erma Bombeck.

More than twenty years after her death, Bombeck’s relatable, self-deprecating stories still have the uncanny ability to leave readers laughing out loud, not so much at her, but at themselves. You don’t have to be a mother to laugh at Erma’s take on parenting. (“Once they put a hamster on my chest and when I bolted upright they asked, ‘Do you have any alcohol for the chemistry set?’”)

via The 3 Steps to Writing Humor: Channeling Erma

Creating Tension in Fiction and Memoir

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by Michael Mohr

One of the toughest things to do in fiction or creative nonfiction writing, in my professional opinion, is to create strong, believable tension. Without tension—between the protagonist and a villain, the protagonist and him/herself, the protagonist and the environment, etc—you really don’t have much of a story. And it’s unlikely readers will want to follow you far through the jungle of your narrative.

Tension seems to be lumped in usually with plot. I agree that plot and tension often go hand in hand, but I also think that stories which essentially lack, for the most part, any real sense of “A-plus-B-equals-C” type of standard plot (meaning one thing happens which forces another to happen, etc, a sort of “causes and conditions” situation) can still grab readers’ interest and hold our attention for 250, 300 pages…as long as you’ve got real, authentic tension.

 

via Creating Tension in Fiction and Memoir

How to Balance Quality with Quantity to Write More, Better

 

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by Meg Dowell

Writing a lot and writing well at the same time? It’s not easy, but it’s possible.

I know of writers and overall content creators who publish a new piece of content every day — and their work is usually good. But not always great.

I also know of creators who publish new content less frequently — and it’s always phenomenal.

And then there are those people who can crank out new stuff every day and CRUSH IT (meaning dominate, succeed, do a really good job) every time.

How do those superhumans do it?

Turns out they aren’t superhuman at all (disappointment). They’re just really good at taking a really big mess of a thing, trimming it down to something more compact, polishing it quickly, and getting it out there with just enough time left over to do it all again.

via How to Balance Quality with Quantity to Write More, Better

Subtext #amwriting

Writers, you’ll definitely want to check out this post AND save the link! 😉

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

A good story is far more than a recounting of he said, and she said. It’s more than the action and events that form the arc of the story. A good story is all that, but without good subtext, the story never achieves its true potential.

Within our characters, underneath their dialogue, lurks conflict, anger, rivalry, desire, or pride. Joy, pleasure, fear–as the author, we know those emotions are there, but conveying them without beating the reader over the head is where artistry comes into play. The subtext is the hidden story, the hints and allegations; the secret reasoning. It is the content that supports the dialogue and gives private purpose to the personal events.

These are implicit ideas and emotions. These thoughts and feelings may or may not be verbalized, as subtext is most often shown as the unspoken thoughts and motives of characters — what they really…

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To schedule writing time or to wing it? #amwriting

Wonderful post! Write… and remember to live! 😉

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

I think that to be a writer, you must be obsessed with your own art, taking and making time to write. There is no other way to produce a finished book.

But to be a happy writer, you must have a balanced life. What is the point of life if you’re so busy writing about fictional lives that you aren’t present in your own?

That need to be present in my real life is why I schedule my writing time.

Some people manage to fit short bursts of writing into their daily schedule, writing at work while on break or at lunch. Others must schedule a dedicated block of time for writing, by either rising two hours before they must depart for work or by skipping TV in the evening.

I fall into both categories.

When I am gripped with a new idea, I find myself stopping off and on…

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